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Welcome toEpic Farms

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Feeling brave? Try some sentences...

Since it can be pretty tough to figure out words and sentences without any context - particularly when you're learning! - I thought I should give you a hand.  (Did you see what I did there? Ba-dump-bump). These words all have to do with our horses, my most favorite subject, their pages, and the Epic Farms website. Enjoy!

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Let's see what it looks like...

The American Sign Language Alphabet is also known as the Manual Alphabet. When spelling, the palm of your hand should be facing away from you and towards the person you are spelling to.  If you are right-handed, use your right hand. If you're a lefty, use your left. Be careful not to switch back and forth between hands, as it's confusing.  Remember to start slowly; practice your letter formation first and if you're thinking I already said that - you're right! (which probably means it's pretty darn important :o)

Want to try some words?

Hearing people all have different  sounding voices; but I'll bet you already knew that! Some people speak slowly, and some quickly. Some voices are low, some are high, some are soft, and some are loud.  People also have accents and speech patterns. In the same way that hearing people have different voices, accents, and speech patterns, deaf people have different looking hands.  So just as words sound different depending on who's speaking them, they also look different, depending on who's signing them. Make sense?

Thank You​!

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Want to learn more? Click below to visit Lifeprint

(American Sign Language University)

Want to Have some fingerspelling fun?

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**PLEASE NOTE THIS PAGE IS STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION**

The Rochester Method was started by Professor Westervelt at the Rochester School for the Deaf in the late 1800's. This method uses oral (spoken) language to teach lipreading skills to deaf children, together with fingerspelling to help them learn English. The Rochester method is rarely used any more, because it is extremely tedious and takes forever to say something. Can you imagine fingerspelling every single word you say all day long? Yikes!!

The alphabet is probably the single most important thing you can learn in American Sign Language (ASL).  Use the guide below to learn (or practice) your ABC's. DO try to form each letter to match its picture and hold your hand steady. DO NOT try to spell at 500 miles an hour. It's considered rude, nobody will be able to understand you, and you'll mess yourself all up with the need for speed. It is very, very important to learn to form the letters correctly and practice slowly so that you can spell clearly.  Speed will come with practice. It really will - I promise. Happy learning!

I would like to send out a huge thank you to Sami and all of my wonderful deaf friends who helped to make this page possible. Ready? Here goes...

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To God goes the glory!

Welcome toEpic Farms